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John's Personalised
Myopia Management Report

Visit date: 06 Jun 2023

Right eye (OD)

Sphere -1.25
Cylinder -0.50
Axis 90

Left eye (OS)

Sphere -0.75
Cylinder -0.75
Axis 100

How does John's myopia compare?

Learn more about John's myopia and what might happen in the future.

Choose an eye

97th centile

This chart illustrates how your child's spectacle prescription compares to other children of the same age and sex. It is similar to a growth chart which illustrates how tall your child is relative to other children their age. The lines on the chart show the percentile numbers, which can range from 0 to 100. The higher the centile value (closer to 100), the more short-sighted (myopic) your child is. If your child is in the 75th percentile for example, this means that your child is more short-sighted than 75 percent of children the same age and sex.

Much higher than average for John's age. Only 3% of children are more myopic than John.

This chart illustrates how your child's spectacle prescription compares to other children of the same age and sex. It is similar to a growth chart which illustrates how tall your child is relative to other children their age. The lines on the chart show the percentile numbers, which can range from 0 to 100. The higher the centile value (closer to 100), the more short-sighted (myopic) your child is. If your child is in the 75th percentile for example, this means that your child is more short-sighted than 75 percent of children the same age and sex.

2024-02-29T08:02:41.448926 image/svg+xml Matplotlib v3.5.2, https://matplotlib.org/
-6.25 DS

Adult Myopia Level

Without myopia management, your child is expected to reach -6.25 DS by age 20 based on their current centile position.

A child's current prescription and age are the best predictors of future change in glasses. The Adult Equivalent refraction represents the expected overall strength of a prescription (spherical equivalent refraction) by age 20, based on the centile chart. This should not be interpreted as an accurate prediction, but as a reasonable estimate of your child's likely adult prescription. Successful myopia management can substantially reduce progression leading to a lower and safer level of adult myopia.

96th centile

This chart illustrates how your child's spectacle prescription compares to other children of the same age and sex. It is similar to a growth chart which illustrates how tall your child is relative to other children their age. The lines on the chart show the percentile numbers, which can range from 0 to 100. The higher the centile value (closer to 100), the more short-sighted (myopic) your child is. If your child is in the 75th percentile for example, this means that your child is more short-sighted than 75 percent of children the same age and sex.

Much higher than average for John's age. Only 4% of children are more myopic than John.

This chart illustrates how your child's spectacle prescription compares to other children of the same age and sex. It is similar to a growth chart which illustrates how tall your child is relative to other children their age. The lines on the chart show the percentile numbers, which can range from 0 to 100. The higher the centile value (closer to 100), the more short-sighted (myopic) your child is. If your child is in the 75th percentile for example, this means that your child is more short-sighted than 75 percent of children the same age and sex.

2024-02-29T08:02:41.500183 image/svg+xml Matplotlib v3.5.2, https://matplotlib.org/
-5.25 DS

Adult Myopia Level

Without myopia management, your child is expected to reach -5.25 DS by age 20 based on their current centile position.

A child's current prescription and age are the best predictors of future change in glasses. The Adult Equivalent refraction represents the expected overall strength of a prescription (spherical equivalent refraction) by age 20, based on the centile chart. This should not be interpreted as an accurate prediction, but as a reasonable estimate of your child's likely adult prescription. Successful myopia management can substantially reduce progression leading to a lower and safer level of adult myopia.

How could Myopia Management help John?

The potential benefits of myopia management.

Choose an eye

The goal of myopia management is to slow down the worsening of vision in children who are short sighted (myopic). In the short term, it helps maintain their clear vision without spectacles, for example their vision when they wake up in the morning or when playing outdoors. This can also save on the costs of frequently changing spectacles or contact lenses because of large prescription changes. The left-hand panel shows this short term benefit in terms of how likely they could have a large change in spectacle prescription over the coming year. In the long term, which is on the right-hand panel, managing myopia can lower the risk of eye diseases that may occur later in life (by age 75) due to high levels of myopia. So, it's like an investment in your child's future eye health. For children with lower levels of myopia the short terms benefits are usually stronger, but for children likely to end up highly myopic, the long-term benefits become more important.

John's progression analysis

1 year change

Likely change in prescription

Large change (more than -0.75D)

33% Without Myopia Management
VS
12% With Myopia Management
64 %

less likely to experience a large change in glasses with myopia management

John's eye health analysis

Lifetime risk

Likely benefits for eye health

Risk of myopia-related complications later in life

33% Without myopia management 12% With myopia management
62 %

less likely to have eye health issues in later life with myopia management

John's progression analysis

1 year change

Likely change in prescription

Large change (more than -0.75D)

33% Without Myopia Management
VS
12% With Myopia Management
64 %

less likely to experience a large change in glasses with myopia management

John's eye health analysis

Lifetime risk

Likely benefits for eye health

Risk of myopia-related complications later in life

24% Without myopia management 10% With myopia management
57 %

less likely to have eye health issues in later life with myopia management

What myopia treatments are available?

Find out about the options for slowing down myopia progression.

What is myopia management?

When we understand how a child's eyes are developing compared to their peers, specific treatment options and lifestyle advice can be given to improve how well they see and help protect their long-term eye health. These activities - with the goal of reducing the likelihood of developing myopia, delaying its onset, or slowing its progression - are known as myopia management.

There are two main goals of myopia management.

  1. To allow your child to see clearly so that they can see well enough for everyday activities like schoolwork and hobbies.

  2. To delay myopia onset or slow its progression help lower their adult level of myopia.

Lowering their adult level of myopia has two main benefits.

  1. Helps to reduce the likelihood of eye health problems in later life.

  2. A lower strength of spectacle prescription is required to see clearly. With lower myopia, children are less dependent on their spectacles, have less difficulty participating in sports and other activities and are even more suitable for laser eye surgery as an adult.

Myopia Management Spectacles

In the past, a child with myopia only had the option of traditional spectacles which allowed them to see clearly. Today, there are spectacle lens designs available which allow a child to see clearly and help to slow down their myopia progression.

To get the greatest benefit from wearing myopia management spectacles, children need to wear their spectacles full time. Your eye care professional will advise you on what the recommended wearing schedule is for your child. Myopia management spectacles have been shown in clinical studies to effectively manage myopia in children and can slow myopia progression by 50 - 60% on average over 2 years.

Is this an option for my child?
  • Spectacles are a suitable option for children at any age.
  • Myopia management spectacles should be worn for at least 12 hours each day to be fully effective, so should not be removed for activities such as reading.
  • Children who are active or take part in sports/activities where spectacles are not convenient may still require contact lenses for those activities.
  • Myopia management spectacle lenses may look slightly different to conventional spectacle lenses.
  • Myopia management spectacles are a suitable option if you or your eye care professional have concerns regarding hygiene habits required for successful contact lens wear.
  • Your eye care professional can best advise you if myopia management spectacles are available for your child.
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Myopia Management Daytime Contact Lenses
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    Proven to cut the worsening of myopia by half 1†

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    Children as young as 8 years old can confidently apply and remove MiSight ® 1 day contact lenses on their own 2

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    9 out of 10 children prefer MiSight® 1 day contact lenses over glasses2

  • Learn more about MiSight® 1 day

Soft contact lenses are available for myopia management. These lenses are designed to be worn during the daytime. Some designs are available as a daily disposable (a fresh, new lens every day - no cleaning required) while others are re-used for one month or longer (with proper cleaning and storing each night).

Myopia management daytime contact lenses provide your child with two benefits, clear, spectacle-free vision when worn throughout the day whilst also slowing their myopia progression. For example, MiSight®1 day soft contact lenses are specifically designed for children with myopia and can cut the worsening of myopia by half.1†

To get the greatest benefit from wearing myopia management daytime contact lenses, children are encouraged to wear their contact lenses full time, typically a minimum of 10 hours per day for at least 6 days per week. Your eye care professional will advise you on what the recommended wearing schedule is for your child.

Is this an option for my child?
  • Soft contact lenses for myopia management are an ideal option for active children and those that enjoy playing sports, with no glasses to get in the way or break.
  • Children who wear contact lenses report higher self-esteem, sports participation, and enhanced social skills.
  • Age is not a barrier for wearing contact lenses, literature has shown that most children can handle soft contact lenses easily.
  • With all contact lens wear, for either children or adults, there is a very small risk of infection or inflammation. Maintenance of good hygiene and wearing habits are required to help with healthy lens wear. Daily disposable lenses are associated with the lowest risks as children apply a new, sterile lens each day.
  • Myopia management daytime contact lenses are available in a wide range of prescriptions but there are some prescriptions which are not yet available. Your eye care professional can best advise you if myopia management daytime contact lenses are available for your child.

. Using measured and modeled data, pooled across ages (8-17), MiSight® 1 day slowed myopia progression by an average of approximately 50%.

1. Arumugam B, Bradley A, Hammond D, Chamberlain P. Modelling Age Effects of Myopia Progression for the MiSight 1 day Clinical Trial. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2021;62(8):2333.

2. Sulley A et al. Wearer experience and subjective responses with dual focus compared to spherical, single vision soft contact lenses in children. Optom Vis Sci 2019; 96: E-abstract 195252.

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Myopia Management Overnight Contact Lenses (Orthokeratology lenses)
dreamlite-logo
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    CE approved custom made night lens for myopia management proven to slow myopia in children and young adults.

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    Recharge vision overnight - no more glasses or daytime contacts. Ultimate freedom!

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    DreamLite® has been prescribed for myopia for over 20 years.

  • Learn more about DreamLite®

Orthokeratology (Ortho-K) lenses such as Dreamlite® MC are rigid contact lenses specially designed to be worn overnight. They correct your child's myopia by gently reshaping their cornea (clear layer at the front of the eye) during sleeping hours. When the lenses are removed in the morning, children experience clear vision during the day without needing to wear any vision correction such as spectacles. To be most effective, Ortho-K lenses must be worn consistently every night. Your eye care professional will advise you on the recommended wearing schedule for your child. Ortho-K lenses have been shown in clinical studies to effectively manage myopia in children and can slow progression by up to 50%.

Is this an option for my child?
  • Ortho-K is an ideal option for active children, particularly if your child frequently participates in water sports such as swimming (more than just a weekly lesson) or sports that are played in a dusty environment.
  • Children who wear Ortho-K lenses report better vision related quality of life.
  • Ortho-K offers you the chance to be actively involved in your child's treatment as your child only wears their contact lenses overnight while sleeping. Lens handling and hygiene can be supervised should you wish.
  • With all contact lens wear, for either children or adults, there is a small risk of infection or inflammation, maintenance of good hygiene and wearing habits are required to help with healthy lens wear.
  • Children may experience some eye sensitivity initially with Ortho-K.
  • Ortho-K lenses are customized specifically for each individual eye and are available in a range of prescriptions but there are some prescriptions which are not available. Your eye care professional can best advise you if Ortho-K is available for your child.
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What else can we do?

Learn more about what other steps we can take to protect John's eyes.

Optimising Lifestyle and Visual Habits for Better Eye Health

Although our family history can influence our chances of developing myopia and high myopia (a child is more likely to become myopic if one or both parents are short-sighted - thanks Mom and Dad!), for most people, it's our lifestyle that has the greatest influence on whether we develop myopia.

We now know that the risk of becoming myopic and the probability that a child's vision will deteriorate rapidly as they grow can be reduced by optimizing our children's lifestyle and visual habits. This involves finding the right balance between time spent doing near work and time spent outdoors. Below are some key things you can do.

Maximise Outdoor Time

Parents are very aware of the many benefits associated with children spending time outdoors. The obvious benefits of fresh air and physical exercise on their general health are not the only rewards for kids who play outdoors. Research has shown that children who spend more time outdoors and less time on near work appear to be less myopic, with the opposite also being true. Low levels of outdoor activity, particularly when coupled with high levels of near work, are a risk factor for myopia. Research is still ongoing as to the reason why outdoor time matters for myopia development, but we do know that small lifestyle changes which promote increased time outdoors appear to be beneficial for your child's eye health.

What can I do?

If your child is already myopic, more outdoor time can help to slow down the speed of change of their myopia.

If your child isnt yet myopic and particularly if they are at risk of becoming myopic (pre-myope), more outdoor time helps to reduce the risk of developing myopia in the first place.

The recommended time for daily outdoor play is at least 2 hours for children over the age of six. That may seem like a lot, but you can include time such as break times in the school playground or even chores like mowing the lawn.

Obviously, don't forget sunscreen when needed!

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Optimise Near Work

Near work is typically defined as activities that our eyes focus on at a close distance such as reading, studying or doing homework. More time spent on near work activities is associated with a higher chance of developing myopia.

Our children spend lots of time doing essential near work, especially in relation to their education. Children start pre-school at an early age and a lot of early learning is driven by near activities such as reading, arts and crafts or simply playing.

The length of time that children spend in education is now also much longer, with more people continuing with education into their early twenties as they go on to study at university. Once formal education is complete, most people enter a work environment which also requires extensive near work such as using computers, so it is common for people to become more myopic even in adult life.

What can I do?

School time is obviously non-negotiable, and no one wishes to discourage a child that loves to read.

A good rule of thumb is to try to ensure that children limit any near work such as reading or homework outside of school time to less than 3 hours per day.

Children should be encouraged to take regular breaks from near work, and not to hold reading material or screens too close to their eyes (closer than 25cm). For example; 20-20 rule. This means every 20 minutes, taking a 20 second break to look at something further away.

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Limit Screen Time

Smartphones, tablets, and computers are widely used at an early age in both home and school life. Smartphones have become an essential part of modern life and make up a significant amount of the time we spend on near activities. High levels of screen time, such as looking at a smartphone is associated with an increased risk of myopia.

Before you decide to confiscate your childs tablet, our lifestyle habits (lots of near work in particular) have been causing children to become myopic long before the invention of the smartphone. However, our current generation of children are the first to grow up in the smartphone era which competes for our children’s leisure time and distracts them from spending time outdoors. It is this relationship between screen use, how long we spend using them and how closely we are focusing on them that is undergoing further research.

Technology such as smartphones are not going anywhere. It is not realistic to expect young people to abandon their phones just because they might become myopic and as parents, it is important to realize that it is ok for children to use and enjoy their devices.

We just need to find the right balance between time spent indoors doing near tasks including devices and time spent outdoors away from near work. So, putting our phones down, spending time outdoors is vital for healthy eye development.

What can I do?

As well as encouraging regular breaks from near work and holding near objects further away as explained in more detail in the ‘Optimize near work’ section, please see below for some guidance on screen time (you might love or hate this).

Guidelines for Screen Time In Children

Children should be advised to take regular breaks when using screens, at least a 20-minute break every hour or so. They should also be advised not to hold the screen too close. Below are screen time guidelines for children according to their age.

Children under 2 years

No screen time.

Excessive screen time reduces language development and increases the likelihood of childhood obesity.

Children 2-5 years

Maximum of 1 hour of screen time per day.

High rates of screen time affect social skills development, language development and increase the risk of obesity.

Children 5-17 years

Maximum of 2 hours of screen time per day.

Should be limited to 2 hours of recreational screen time per day. As well as the benefits for myopia, keeping track of and limiting recreational screen time use can lead to positive improvements in sleep and school performance.

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Regular Eye Checks

Regular eye checks are really important for all children to make sure that their eyes are developing as expected and that any eye problems, including myopia are detected and treated early. Children do not always realize if something isn’t quite right with their vision, which makes it harder for them to tell their parents. They may show some signs like squinting, moving closer to see something or even closing one eye, but not always.

When we understand how a child’s eyes are developing compared to their peers, specific treatment and advice can be given to improve how well they see and protect their long-term eye health.

Regular eye checks are important to ensure your child’s myopia management plan is working and optimised for their (and your) lifestyle. The plan should change and evolve as your child grows, and treatment can be adjusted to give the maximum benefit.

What can I do?

Your eye care practitioner will schedule regular follow up appointments to check your child’s progress with their personal myopia management plan and advise on progress at each appointment. Early treatment and regular assessment are ideal to get the best possible outcomes.

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